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Full text of "North Carolina Symphony: Tips to Teachers"

TIPS 

TO 
TEACHERS 




csrcsrs 



TIPS TB TEACHERS 



By Adeline Mc C a 1 1_ 

CONTENTS 

How to Make Your Children's Concert a Success 2 

Little Symphony Children's Concert Program 1976 - 1977 4 

The Two Songs 5 
Notes on the Children's Program 

OVERTURE - Mozart 8 

LA PAIX from "Royal Fireworks Music" 11 

THE PERCUSSION SCORE 12 

THE BIRDS - Respighi 17 

SUITE from "Louisiana Story" - Thomson 21 

SUITE No. 2 for Small Orchestra - Stravinsky 23 
Finger Painting 
Movement a.nd Music 



26 
28 



Instruments of the Orchestra 30 



Sources of Percussion and Melody Instruments 



32 



r 



HOW TO MAKE YOUR EHIbBREN'S 
EQNEERT A SUEEESS 



1. Be sure that principals, teachers, and school administrators 
have the date and the hour of the children's concert set in 
their schedules well in advance. 

2. Arrange for a director of transportation to work out bus 
schedules . 

3. Make a seating plan and send duplicate copies to all schools. 

4. Study the children's concert program and order the 
instrumental recordings from the North Carolina Symphony 
Office. Also, order enough Symphony Stories for each child 
to have his own copy. 

Address : North Carolina Symphony 
Department of Education 
Post Office Box 28026 
Raleigh, North Carolina 27611 

5. Notify your schools to urge all librarians to take part in 
preparing children for the North Carolina Symphony concert 
by : 

Circulating Symphony recordings. 

Showing filmstrips and telling stories related 
to the program. 

Placing books and pictures about composers and 
the instruments of the orchestra on display. 

Encouraging children's original art work. 

GET STARTED EARLY 

1. Allow time in your schedule for children to hear the recordings 
many times. 

2. Teach the two songs which children must memorize to sing 
at the concert : 

FOR THE BEAUTY OF THE EARTH 3 stanzas 

OH! SUSANNA 2 stanzas 

3. Select an instrumental group and teach them to play Oh! 
SUSANNA, following the instructions in Symphony Stories with 
the recording of LA PAIX from Handel's "Royal Fireworks 
Music." Recording : Vanguard SRV - 209 SD. This was 
purchased for last year's program. 

- 2 - 



THE PERCUSSION SCORE IS FOR CLASSROOM USE ONLY. 
ENCOURAGE A VARIETY OF MUSICAL ACTIVITIES IN YOUR CLASSROOM, such as 

1. Learning to recognize the orchestral instruments by sight 
and sound. 

2. Viewing filmstrips and films related to the symphony 
orchestra . 

3. Reading books and stories about the orchestra and its in- 
struments . 

4. Making a seating chart and constructing model symphony 
orchestra players. 

5. Collecting materials for bulletin board displays. 

6. Painting murals, posters, pictures, making puppets and 
puppet stage. 

7. Learning about composers; writing stories and plays related 
to their music. 

8. Discussing and writing impressions of the music before and 
after the concert. 

9. Creating free movement, dancing to the music. 
10. Making illustrated "symphony" notebooks. 



- 3 - 



THE NORTH CAROLINA LITTLE SYMPHONY Season 1976 - 1977 



John Gosling, Artistic Director/Conductor 
James Edwin Ogle, Jr., Assistant Conductor 
Benjamin F. Swalin, Conductor Emeritus 

PROGRAM 



MOZART 
HANDEL 



Overture (To be announced) 

La Paix from "Royal Fireworks 
Music" 



Recordings 

None 

Vanguard SRV - 209 
SD (Purchased 
last year) 



CONRAD KOCHER SONG: For the Beauty of the Earth 

Children sing three stanzas 



RESPIGHI 



Suite - "The Birds" (Gli Uccelli) London CS 6624 

Prelude (Preludio) 

The Nightingale (L' Usignuolo) 

The Hen (La Gallina) 



THOMSON 



Suite - "Louisiana Story" 

Chorale 

STEPHEN FOSTER SONG: Oh! Susannah 

Children's Instrumental Group plays 
first stanza 



Children sing two stanzas as printed 

in Symphony Stories 

Suite No. 2 for Small Orchestra 

Marche 
Valse 
Polka 
Galop 

Demonstration of Instruments 



Turnabout TVS 34534 



STRAVINSKY 



Columbia M 31729 



Surprise numbers to be announced at concert 



- 4 - 



THE TWO SQNGS 



AT THE CONCERT THE CHILDREN WILL SING TWO SONGS WITH THE 
ORCHESTRA 

Both songs are printed in Symphony Stories . 
The words of the songs are to be memorized. 
Do not bring words or music to the concert. 

Tell children to watch the conductor for the signal to stand. 
The orchestra will play an introduction before each song. 
Children should not start singing until the conductor gives 
the signal. Success in singing together in a large hall will 
be assured if you will stress the importance of listening, and 

WATCHING THE CONDUCTOR THROUGHOUT THE SONG . 

The conductor will indicate by his baton movements any changes 
he wishes to make 

in TEMPO (Faster or slower) or 

in DYNAMICS (Louder or softer). 

In your classroom before the concert help your singers to 
start together on the first note by practicing the attack. 
Give them a preparatory beat to insure a "clean" attack. 

1. FOR THE BEAUTY OF THE EARTH 

This hymn of praise is a universal favorite. It should 
be sung as smoothly as possible. Keep a legato line 
throughout, with dynamic chan ges^ as indic ated below: 

For the Beauty of the ear thy For the beauty of the skies, 

For the love which from our birth Over and around us 




Lord of all to Thee we raise This our hymn of grateful 
praise. 



Meter: 4/4 J = 96 
Count four in each measure. 



\ 



Conduct 




Preparatory beat is on "Four." Song starts on 
downbeat "One. " I 

MEMORIZE ALL THREE STANZAS 



- 5 - 



OH ! SUSANNA 

This song by the American composer, Stephen Foster, has been 
played and sung for nearly a century. It is loved by the 
people of our country, and it has traveled abroad. Like 
many of Stephen Foster's songs it has the appeal of a folk 
song, and seems to call for a banjo or guitar accompaniment, 
and for dancing. Before your children sing two stanzas of 
Oh! Susanna a selected instrumental group from your schools 
will be asked to play the song through once. 



Meter: 2/4 J = 92 

Count two in each measure. Conduct 



Jf 



Preparatory beat is "One." Song starts on 

last half of 



4 



"Second beat. " 

f*. 

Instructions for the Instrumental Group: 

1. Use only the instruments indicated in Symphony Stories 3 

WINDS - Recorders, tonettes, flutes, clarinets (Key of G), 
and other small winds. No brass instruments . 

BELLS - Melody bells, xylophones, marimbas and resonator 
or tone bells. 

VIOLINS 

AUTOHARPS 

2. The children chosen to take part in the instrumental group 
should be rehearsed ahead of time - WITHOUT A PIANO. 

3. The music must be memorized. 

4. If players from a number of schools are included, the 
music teacher or supervisor should go from school to school, 
rehearsing each group in exactly the same way, at the same 
tempo. Please make it clear that the players will be 

"on their own" at the concert, and in order to keep 
together they will have to watch the director and listen 
carefully . 



- 6 - 



The autoharp players should keep a firm, steady beat 
throughout. As a signal to start the autoharps will sound 
two strong F - chords, in strict tempo. 



AUTOHARP CHORDS 






F 


r f c 7 


F 


f f a | F : 


B> 


8> f £' 


F 


F F£ 7 F 



- 7 - 



NOTES QN THE PROGRAM 

In planning your listening lessons for the year, you may want 
to allot some time to helping your children become better 
acquainted with a few of the popular overtures often heard on 
concert programs. Your library may already have recordings of 
overtures to check out for classroom use. The best source 
(on one recording) is the Bowmar Orchestral Library album 
entitled OVERTURES (BOL # 76). This may be ordered from 
• Bowmar, 622 Rodier Drive, Glendale, California, 91201. It 
includes the following: 

OVERTURE TO "THE BAT" (Die Fledermaus) by Strauss 

ACADEMIC FESTIVAL OVERTURE by Brahms 

OVERTURE TO "THE MARRIAGE OF FIGARO" by Mozart 

ROMAN CARNIVAL OVERTURE by Berlioz 



MORE ABOUT WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART 

Most children in the elementary schools have heard Mozart's 
music, have read or been told about Mozart as a child and 
perhaps can identify him as a composer belonging to the 
eighteenth century. But there is so much to know and absorb 
about this genius, whose life was cut short at the age of 
thirty-five, that teachers will do well to broaden their 
information, and inspire their students to explore Mozart 
in greater depth. As a starter, you might see how many of 
your children are familiar with the following facts: 

1. Wolfgang Mozart (Volfgahng Mot-sahrt) was born in 
Salzburg, Austria, January 27, 1756. Father Mozart 
carried his tiny son to church on a birrerly cold day 
to have him baptized. 

2. When Wolfgang was five years old, he composed his 
first piece - a little minuet. 

3. Mozart's father, Leopold, took Wolfgang and his sister, 
Nannerl, to many great cities in Europe where they 
gave concerts for kings and queens. 

4. As a stunt, Wolfgang played the harpsichord with a 
cloth stretched over the keys. 

5. The Austrian Emperor called him "a little magician." 

6. Wolfgang and Nannerl were both taught by their father, 
who was an excellent violinist and a composer as well. 



8 - 



7. Mozart learned to play the violin, the organ, the 
clavichord, harpsichord and piano. 

8. Mozart wrote forty-nine symphonies, the first one at 
the age of eight. 

9. Mozart wrote his musical scores very rapidly without 
making any changes. 

10. Mozart was noted for his clear neat handwriting. 

11. Mozart had a rather large head, an important looking 
nose and big blue eyes. 

12. Mozart loved beautiful clothes and fine jewelry. 

13. After his marriage to Constance Weber, the Mozarts 
lived in Vienna. 

14. In Vienna Mozart wrote "contradanses" or country dances 
for the public festivals. These dances were popular 

in Europe at the time George Washington was president 
of the United States. 

15. Mozart enjoyed pleasant company and liked to dance, 
bowl, and play billiards. 

16. The Mozarts were at times very poor and their two 
little sons were often cold and hungry. 

17. Mozart's son, Wolfgang Amadeus , named for his father, 
became a talented pianist and composer, and made his 
living as a music teacher. 

18. As a young man Mozart was a friend of the composer, 
Joseph Haydn, who was twenty- four years older than he. 

19. Mozart's greatest opera, "Don Giovanni," was produced 
in Prague four years before he died. 

20. Every summer, in Mozart's native city of Salzburg, 
there is a music festival held in his honor. Tourists 
from all over the world come to hear the music of this 
renowned composer. 

FURTHER INFORMATION ON M0ZART"S LIFE AND MUSIC 



BOOKS 



Kaufmann, Helen L. 

Mirsky, Reba Paeff 

Wheeler, Opal & 
Deucher, Sybil 



THE STORY OF MOZART 
MOZART 



MOZART THE WONDER BOY (a 
classic for children to 
read) 



Grossett, 1955 
Follett, 1960 

Dutton, 1943 



- 9 



Woodford, Peggy MOZART Walck, 1966 



COLOR FILMSTRIPS 



WOLFGANG MOZART PLAYS FOR THE KING AND QUEEN by Adeline McCall 
No. 638 - 1 from the series, "Musical Adventures" Singer - 
Society for Visual Education, Inc., 1345 Diversey Parkway, 
Chicago, Illinois 60614. 

WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART No. 4 from the series, "Great Composers 
and Their Music" Jam Handy - Scott Educational Division, The 
Jam Handy Organization, 5 Lower Westfield Road, Holyoke, 
Massachusetts 01040. 

THE MAGIC FLUTE from the series, "Opera and Ballet Stories" 
Jam Handy - Scott Educational Division (Address above). 

BOOKBOX STUDY UNIT - MOZART. Includes recording, charts, 
pictures for display. Keyboard Publications, 1346 Chapel 
Street, New Haven, Connecticut 06511. 



- 10 - 



LA PAIX from "Royal Fireworks Music" Recording: Vanguard 
George Frideric Handel SRV-209 SD 

1685-1759 (Purchased last year) 

George Frideric Handel, the German composer who went to London, 
was commissioned by King George II of England to write music 
for a great peace celebration in Green Park. It was 1749 and 
a long European war had just ended with the signing of the 
treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle. A spectacular fireworks display 
was being planned. Since the music was to be played outdoors 
Handel's score included 40 trumpets, 20 horns, 16 oboes, 16 
bassoons, a contra bassoon, a serpent, 8 pairs of kettledrums, 
12 side drums, flutes and fifes as well as a complete string 
section . 

As originally written, the "Royal Fireworks Music" consisted 
of an Overture, to be played before the fireworks display 
started, and five short movements: 1) Bourree; 2) Largo alia 
Siciliana (La Paix); 3) Allegro (La Rejouissance) ; 4) Minuet 
I and 5) Minuet II. At last year's children's concert the 
Orchestra played La Rejouissance and the two Minuets. This 
year's program will feature LA PAIX, a quiet number for strings 
and a few wind instruments in the style of a Siciliano . 

The Siciliano is a 17th - 18th century dance type of Sicilian 
origin. It is in very moderate 6/8 or 12/8 meter, usually 
with a flowing, broken chord accompaniment and a soft lyrical 
melody with dotted rhythms. Sometimes it is used as a slow 
movement in early sonatas. It also appears in operas and 
cantatas whenever soft rural scenes are to be described. 
Handel's LA PAIX (The Peace) meets this description of the 
Siciliano completely. 

The score of LA PAIX calls for two clarinets, a bassoon, two horns, 
flutes, oboes, bassoons and violins, viola, cello and bass. 
The form is traditional - A A B B - eight measures repeated, 
followed by another eight measures repeated. Children should 
familiarize themselves with the music by listening many times 
before attempting to play the percussion score (See the outside 
back cover of Symphony Stories) . Directions for teaching 
children how to play the percussion score follow. 



- 11 - 



THE PERCUSSION SEQRE 



The percussion score on the outside back cover of Symphony 
Stories is to be played with the recording of LA PAIX from 
Handel's "Royal Fireworks Music" (Vanguard S R V - 209 SD). 
ENJOY THIS CLASSROOM EXPERIENCE BY PLAYING ALONG WITH YOUR 
CH I LDREN . Do not bring percussion instruments to the concert 



TEACHING PROCEDURES : 

1. Play the recording a number of times for listening only. 

2. Looking at the score, explain the meter - 6/8. There are 
six eighth notes in each measure - two groups of three 

JJ7 m 

3. Since the tempo is slow, you can count 1 2 3 4 5 6 and let 
the children try "conducting" the music in the traditional 
way: £ 




4. Clap the first beat in each measure, then let the children 
learn to clap the note values written for each part. 
Practice these patterns first: 

-01 m j. i *t)\*m >rm\ 

5. See that you have all the required percussion instruments 
in place - one for each child - ahead of time: 

DRUMS TAMBOURINES STICKS MARACAS JINGLE BELLS 

TRIANGLES FINGER CYMBALS 

(Wood blocks may be used instead of sticks) 



- 12 - 



MORE ABOUT GEORGE FRIDERIC HANDEL * 



Children who attended last year's concert may wish to refer to their 
Symphony Stories for information about the "Royal Fireworks Music." 
Fire broke out after the Overture was played, and Handel's musicians 
had to run for their lives. Some time later the music was performed 
at a benefit concert to raise money for a Foundling Hospital in 
London . 

You might want to review a few facts about Handel to stimulate 

your children to read books and see filmstrips relating to his life: 

1. George Frideric Handel was born in Halle, Germany, in 1685, 
the same year in which Johann Sebastian Back was born. 

2. When George was a little boy he ran away from home, follow- 
ing a group of street musicians. 

3. George's father did not want his son to have anything to 
do with music - much less become a musician. 

4. The boy loved music so much that his aunt Anna gave him a 
small harpsichord, which was hidden away in the attic for 
secret practicing. 

5. Handel's father was a surgeon for the Duke's Court not far 
from Halle. 

6. On one of the doctor's trips to the Court, George ran 
after his coach. His father had to stop the horses and take 
the boy in. 

7. The organist at the Duke's Chapel discovered the boy's talent 
and allowed him to play the organ. 

8. After the Duke heard George playing in the chapel he 
ordered Dr. Handel to give his son music lessons. 

9. When Handel grew up he became a famous musician, and went 
to England to live. 

10. He became the idol of the London public and was a guest 
of honor everywhere. 

11. When Handel's former employer, the Elector of Hanover, 
became George I, King of England, he was too German to 
please the English taste. In order to gain popularity 
he appointed Handel as palace chapel master. 

12. Handel taught music to the children of the Prince of 
Wales, and wrote his first Suite for Harpsichord for 
Princess Anne. 



- 13 - 



13. Handel wrote many operas which were well loved by the 
English audiences. 

14. The oratorio, Messiah , considered by some critics to 
be Handel's masterpiece, was first performed in Dublin. 
It is sung in many American cities every year. 

15. Handel became blind in his last years, but he was still 
able to play the organ. 

16. When Handel died, he was buried in Westminister Abbey. 
This was the highest honor England could pay to the 
world-famous composer. 



* Note : There are various spellings for Handel's first name. From 
the different possibilities Handel himself adopted the 
English form: 

GEORGE FRIDERIC HANDEL 



- 14 - 



FURTHER INFORMATION ON HANDEL'S LIFE AND WORK 



BOOKS 



Berk, Phyllis L. 



Flower , Newman 



DUKE'S COMMAND (children) 



Lantern Press, 

354 Hussey Road 

Mt. Vernon, N.Y. 10552 



GEORGE FRIDERIC HANDEL: His Scribner, 1948 
Personality and His Times - 
A Friendly Biography based 
on extensive research 



Rolland, Romain 
Sadie, Stanley 

Wheeler, Opal 

Young, Percy M. 
Young, Percy M. 



HANDEL 

HANDEL (Great Composer 
Series ) 

HANDEL: AT THE COURT OF 
KINGS (A classic 
biography for children) 

HANDEL 

HANDEL 

(A reference book, inc- 
luding a calendar of 
Handel's life, catalog of 
compositions, etc. 
Illustrated) 



Garden City, 1971 
Crowell, 1969 

Dutton, 1943 

D. White, 1967 
Pellegrini, 1949 



COLOR FILMSTRIPS 



GEORGE HANDEL AND HIS SPINET by Adeline McCall--Correlated 
narration & music No. 683 - 2 from the series, "Musical Adventures." 
Singer - Society for Visual Education, Inc., 1345 Diversey Parkway, 
Chicago, Illinois 60614 

THE STORY OF HANDEL'S MESSIAH, No. 860 - 5R with narration and 
music, symphony orchestra & Choral Union, Northwestern University - 
Same publisher, address above. 

GEORGE FREDERICK HANDEL from the Series, Great Composers and Their 
Music, correlated narration and music. Scott Education Division, 
Jam Handy Lower Westfield Road, Holyoke, Massachusetts. 01040 

FILMS 

GEORGE FREDERICK HANDEL. United World, 10 minutes, black & white. 
Introduced by Handel's struggle to study music, a boys' choir 
sings from "Messiah," and an orchestra plays "Largo." 



- 15 - 



HANDEL AND HIS MUSIC. Coronet. 13 minutes, color. Handel and the 
development of baroque music, with selections from "Messiah." 

BOOKBOX STUDY UNIT - GEORGE FREDERICK HANDEL 

Includes recording, charts, pictures for display. 

Young Keyboard Publications, 1346 Chapel Street, New Haven, 

Connecticut. 06511 






- 16 - 



THE BIRDS (Gli Uccelli) Recording : London 

Suite for Small Orchestra CS6624 

Prelude (Preludio) 

The Nightingale (L' Usignuolo ) 

The Hen (La Gallina) 

Ottorino Respighi 

1879-1936 

At the beginning of the twentieth century a group of young 
Italian composers dedicated themselves to restoring the 
traditions of instrumental music that had been established in 
the 17th century by Corelli, Scarlatti, Vivaldi, Tartini and 
others. Due to the tremendous development of opera in Italy, 
symphonic and chamber music had suffered a decline. The 
leader of the new movement for the advancement of instrumental 
music was Ottorino Respighi, a gifted violinist, violist, and 
teacher of composition. His orchestral works, "The Fountains 
of Rome" and "The Pines of Rome" made him world-famous but 
he had other successes with operas, concertos, and with works 
for chamber orchestras. 

THE BIRDS (Gli Uccelli) is a Suite for Small Orchestra based 
on the music of old masters of the 17th century - Jean-Phillipe 
Rameau, Bernardo Pasquini, Jacques de Gallot, and an anonymous 
English composer. The score calls for flutes, oboe, clarinets, 
bassoons, horns, trombones, celeste, and strings. There are 
five movements including a prelude. Each of the four movements 
is named for a bird: "The Dove" (Jacques de Gallot); "The 
Hen" (Jean-Phillipe Rameau); "The Nightingale" (Anonymous); 
and "The Cuckoo" (Bernardo Pasquini). At your children's 
concert the Orchestra will play three numbers from the Suite. 



Prelude (Preludio) 



from Bernardo Pasquini (1637-1710) 



Meter - 4/4 Moderately fast (A steady march rhythm) 
With some help the form of the Prelude can be analyzed 
by your children after listening: 

A - 13 measures concluding with a retard (Clap the meter 

4/4) 

B - 3/4 meter 15 measures, introducing themes of the 

hen and the cuckoo 

C - 3/8 meter 44 measures, introducing bird trills in a 

stately dance 

Interlude - 5 measures - 4/4 meter (a bridge to A) 

A - 13 measures concluding with a retard (Same as first 

A section) 

The music of the Prelude is ideally suited to creative 
dance movement. There are changes in mood, meter, 
dynamics and style to express in dancing. 

Note: Bernardo Pasquini was born in Tuscany, December 8, 
1637 and died in Rome on November 22, 1710. He was a 

- 17 - 



famous organist and composed operas, oratorios and 
harpsichord pieces. 

II. The Nightingale (L'Usignuolo) from Anonymous English 

composer 17th century 

The mood of this charming piece suggests a quiet 
garden with a dreamlike bird song. Enjoy listening 
without too much analyzing. Play the nightingale 
theme (in Symphony Stories) on the piano. You might 
also play the pedal point which is heard underneath 
(two octaves below middle C). The contrabasses play 
this in the orchestra. 

III. The Hen (La Gallina) from Jean-Phillipe Rameau 

(1683-1764) 

This movement opens with the unmistakable sound of a 
crackling hen. (See the theme in Symphony Stories and 
play it on the piano). Some children will enjoy 
dramatizing a barnyard scene, and making up "hen" move- 
ments. If your school library has Saint-Saens' "Carnival 
Animals" play the band on the recording entitled Hens 
and Cocks . What art activities might be suggested? 
For ideas on children's art see the color filmstrip: 
(CARNIVAL OF ANIMALS, EAV SE 8019 - Educational Audio- 
Visual, Pleasantville, New York 10570) 

NOTE : Jean-Phillipe Rameau was born at Dijon in 1683 and died 
in Paris in 1764. His father was organist of Dijon 
Cathedral. At seven the child could read any piece of 
harpsichord music given him to play. But he would read 
nothing else and his headmaster had him removed from 
school. When he was eighteen he travelled all over 
Italy, then went around France with a troupe of actors. 
He was an organist in several French towns, ending up 
in Paris, where he became a successful and fashionable 
harpsichord teacher. Rameau wrote many operas and 
ballets. Recognizing him as important in the history 
of French music, Louis XV gave him an appointment at 
court and a pension. 

BIRD MUSIC 

It is surprising to learn that a great many composers 
have written music based on bird songs. If you are 
interested in finding out more about bird music read the 
article in The Oxford Companion to Music , 9th Edition, 
by Percy A. Scholes, pages 107-112. 



- 18 - 



MORE ABOUT OTTORINO RESPIGHI 



1. Ottorino Respighi was born in Bologna on July 9, 1879 and 
died in Rome on April 18, 1936. 

2. He came from a musical family: his grandfather was a 
violinist and organist in a Bologna church; his father taught 
piano and gave his son lessons. 

3. Ottorino studied violin for eight years at the Liceo, and 
was graduated in 1899 with a diploma in violin playing. 

4. He also studied composition with Luigi Torchi . His 
Symphonic Variations was performed at the Lieso Musicale 
of Bologna - his first public recognition. 

5. Later he went to Russia where he played viola in the St. 
Petersburg Opera House, and studied orchestration with 
Rimsky-Korsakof f . 

6. He was given a diploma in composition for an orchestral work, 
Prelude, Chorale, and Fugue . 

7. He left Russia in two years and went to Berlin to study 
composition with Max Bruch. He also taught piano in a 
private school. 

8. Respighi returned to Italy to become professor of 
composition at the Saint Cecilia Academy in Rome in 1913. 
He became director ten years later. 

9. Respighi ' s first major success as a composer was achieved 
with the performance of his symphonic poem, Fountain of Rome , 
on March 11, 1917. Toscanini conducted it three times 

the following year, helping to make it one of the most 
successful works to come from a young Italian composer. 

10. Another symphonic poem, Pines of Rome , completed in 1924, 
became very popular and added to his fame. 

11. The Birds was written in 1928 and in the same year he 
produced another symphonic poem, Roman Festivals . 

12. Respighi visited the United States for the first time in 
1925. He appeared as pianist with the New York Philharmonic 
Orchestra in his Concerto in the Mixolydian Mode . He also 
played with other major American orchestras, and later, in 
1928, attended the premiere of his opera, The Sunken Bell , 
at the Metropolitan Opera House. 

13. Respighi was interested in using church modes and Georgian 
chants in his compositions. An example of this can be 
heard in his orchestral work, Church Windows. Koussevitsky 
gave the first performance of Church Windows with the 
Boston Symphony. 

- 19 - 



14. In 1932 Respighi was made a member of the Royal Academy 
of Italy. 

15. Four years later he had a heart attack and was confined 
to bed. He was able to work on his last opera, Lucrezia , 
which was nearly completed when he died. His wife, who 
had been a former pupil of his in composition, finished 
the score. 

16. As Italy's most famous composer, Respighi was given an 
impressive funeral, attended by the King, Premier Mussolini, 
and many prominent musicians. The music was a funeral Mass 
by Palestrina. 

17. Respighi ' s body was later transferred to his native city, 
Bologna, where it was buried with an elaborate ceremony, 
honoring him with other great men of Bologna's historical 
past . 

FURTHER SUGGESTIONS 

On the same recording with The Bird s you will find Fountains of 
Rome and Pines of Rome . If you have time to explore Fountains 
the use of a filmstrip will be helpful (E A V No. SE 8013 
Respighi FOUNTAINS OF ROME. Order from Educational Audio Visual 
Inc., Pleasantville , N.Y. 10570) Children usually enjoy 
"Pines of the Appian Way" from Pines of Rome . (Described on 
the record jacket.) 



- 20 - 



LOUISIANA STORY - Suite 

Chorale 

Virgil Thomson 

1896- 



Recording : 



Turnabout 
TV-S 34534 



CHORALE is from one of two concert suites prepared by Virgil 
Thomson from the musical score of the motion picture, 
"Louisiana Story." The film by Robert Flaherty is a semi- 
documentary, depicting the industrialization of an unspoiled 
rural area in southwestern Louisiana. This bayou country, at 
the mouth of the Missippi River, inhabited by French-speaking 
Acadians ('Cajuns') proved to be a rich source of native French 
folk songs which Virgil Thomson wove skillfully into his music. 
In Virgil Thomson's book, "Virgil Thomson" (Knopf, 1966), he 
describes the financial difficulties and delays in procuring 
an adequate budget from Standard Oil Company of New Jersey, 
subsidizers of the project. Once the sound track was made by 
the superb musicians of the Philadelphia Orchestra, under the 
direction of Eugene Ormandy, it was nominated for an "Oscar." 
However, it failed to get the Film Academy award because the 
engineers had not "sweetened the line." As Virgil Thomson 
explains, this is a trick used in Hollywood to make the first 
violin part stand out like a solo, with much vibrato. He goes 
on to say that he did receive a Pulitzer Award, the only one 
yet given for a film score. 

The story of the film centers around the reactions of the people 
to the drilling of oil wells and to the adverntures of a little 
boy with a pet raccoon. CHORALE, the second of the four 
sections of the Suite, describes the boy playing with his 
raccoon in the top of a tree and sighting the arrival of a 
drill barge. The music is composed of three different themes 
and a coda: 



B 



B 



Coda 



The main theme (A) is an old Cajun folk tune. (See Symphony 
Stories.) The three other parts of the Suite (not to be played 
at the children's concert) will be interesting to listen to 
in your classroom: I Pastoral (The Bayou and the Marsh Buggy); 
III Passacaglia (Robbing the Alligator's Nest); IV Fugue 
(Boy Fights Alligator.) 



- 21 - 



MORE ABOUT VIRGIL THOMSON 



1. Virgil Thomson is recognized not only as a composer, but as 
one of America's greatest music critics. 

2. He was born in Kansas City, Missouri, on November 25, 1896. 

3. His father was a post office administrator. 

4. As a young child Virgil practiced on an upright piano which 
was kept in the parlor. 

5. He took piano lessons with his cousin, then later studied 
with the best piano teacher in Kansas City. 

6. He was graduated from Harvard in 1922. 

7. While in college he supported himself by accompanying 
singers, playing the piano in theatres, and playing a 
church organ. 

8. After a year in Paris, studying with Nadia Boulanger, he 
returned to Harvard as an assistant instructor. 

9. From 1925 - 1932 he lived in Paris where he met the 
American poet, Gertrude Stein. 

10. In collaboration with Gertrude Stein, Virgil Thomas wrote 
the music for the opera, Four Saints in Three Acts . Gertrude 
Stein's words in the libretto proved to be a controversial 
topic of conversation in the early thirties. It was 

good publicity for both collaborators. 

11. The opera, with an all Negro cast, was successfully 
produced in Hartford, Connecticut, New York and Chicago. 

12. In 1940 Virgil Thomson became music critic of the New 
York Herald Tribune, succeeding Lawrence Gilman. 

13. He travels a great deal, sending in articles to the Tribune 
from places all over the world. 

14. He has written several books, and in addition has 
composed operas, works for orchestra and music for films, 
including The River and The Plough That Broke the Plains . 

15. Virgil Thomson is at present living in New York. 
SUGGESTED READING : 

BOOKS 



Thomson, Virgil 



Thomson, Virgil 



VIRGIL THOMSON Knopf, 1966 

Contains interesting photographs 

of Thomson and contemporaries, 

also correspondence with Gertrude 

Stein. A brilliantly written autobiography 

AMERICAN MUSIC SINCE 1910 Holt, 1971 



- 22 - 



SUITE NO. 2 for Small Orchestras 

Marche 

Valse 

Polka 

Galop 

Igor Stravinsky 

1882-1971 



Recording : 



Columbia M 
31729 



Stravinsky's Suite No. 2 for Small Children was composed in 
1915 in Morges . He wrote the Polka , March and Valse first and 
the Galop was added later. Stravinsky himself explains that 
the music is a caricature, and not to be taken seriously. 
"The Polka" says Stravinsky, "is a caricature of Diaghilev, 
whom I had seen as a circus animal trainer cracking a long 
whip." The simplicity of the music, especially of the bass 
part, was to make fun of Diaghilev' s limited piano technic. 
Stravinsky played the Polka to Diaghilev and Alfred Casella 
in a hotel room in Milan. Both men were astonished at the 
thin orchestration which came as a shock after the tremendous 
score of the Sacre du Printemps . Neither realized at the time 
that Stravinsky was going into a new period of "neo-classicism. " 

The Valse was written to pay tribute to Erik Satie, whom 
Stravinsky admired and loved. He called it a little ice 
cream wagon waltz. The other pieces he composed as music 
lessons for his two children, Theodore and Mike. The Galop is 
caricature of the St. Petersburg Folies Bergeres . When Ravel 
first heard it he thought it should be played faster - like 
a French Can-can. 

The instrumentation of the Suite includes 2 flutes, piccolo, 
oboe, 2 clarinets, 2 bassoons, horn in F, trumpet in C, trombone, 
tuba, percussion instruments (big drum, tenor drum, cymbals) 
piano and strings. 

The strong rhythmic elements of the music will probably offer 
children opportunities to make up original movement, to add 
percussion instruments, perhaps to make "crazy" costumes or 
designs. After hearing the music a number of times let 
them discuss the music, how it makes them feel, and offer 
their ideas. 



- 23 - 



MORE ABOUT IGOR STRAVINSKY 



1. Igor Stravinsky heard a great deal of music as he was 
growing up. 

2. His father was a well-known bass singer at the Imperial 
Opera. 

3. When Igor was nine years old he was given piano lessons; 
he liked to practice, but he detested his school studies. 

4. His parents insisted on his getting a good education, and 
they sent him off to the University of St. Petersburg to 
to study law. 

5. He really had no interest in becoming a lawyer, but he 
completed his course of study in 1905. 

6. A year later Igor and his cousin, Catherine, were married. 
She knew how much he loved music, and encouraged him 

to give up law and spend all his time learning to be a 
composer. 

7. This was the beginning of a wonderful musical life, and 
a happy marriage. 

8. The Stravinskys had four children: two boys and two girls 
Igor was a devoted father and took time to be with them, 
play with them and enjoy them. 

9. Stravinsky was fortunate to have the famous teacher of 
orchestration, Rimsky-Korsakof f , who recognized his genius 
It was through Rimsky-Korsakof f that he met Sergei 
Diaghilev, director of the Russian Ballet. 

10. Diaghilev gave him commissions for three ballets; The 
Firebird , Petrouchka , and The Rite of Spring . His fame 
began with the Russian ballet, although he wrote many 
more significant works. 

11. After the Revolution, the Stravinsky family lived in 
France and in Switzerland. 

12. When Harvard University invited him to give a series of 
lectures, Stravinsky came to the United States, and 
later became a United States citizen. 

13. He and his second wife, Vera, lived in Hollywood, where 
they had a beautiful home and entertained many visitors. 

14. Stravinsky's son, Soulima, became a fine pianist. His 
older son, Theodore, and his daughter, Melina, were both 
talented in art. 



- 24 - 



BOOKS 



Craft , Robert 
Libman, Lillian 



STRAVINSKY 

AND MUSIC AT THE CLOSE: 
Stravinsky's Last years 



Stravinsky, Theodore CATHERINE AND IGOR STRAVINSKY 

Many photographs of the family 



Knopf, 1972 
Norton, 1972 



Boosey & Hawkes , 
1975 



FOR YOUNG READERS 
Debrin, Arnold 

Young, Percy M. 
Posell, Elsa Z 



IGOR STRAVINSKY: HIS LIFE 
AND TIMES 

STRAVINSKY 

RUSSIAN COMPOSERS 
Stravinsky - page 100 



Crowell, 1969 

D. White, 1970 
Houghton, 1967 






- 25 - 



FINGER PAINTING 



FINGER PAINTING, unlike painting with brushes, furnishes a simple, 
direct way of extending the child's listening experiences. The 
medium is not demanding, and it offers a high degree of tactile 
satisfaction. To be successful with a group of children, the 
situation must be carefully prepared in advance. 

MATERIALS NECESSARY FOR FINGER PAINTING 

Smooth surfaced tables (enamel, masonite, linoleum tops 
or hardwood) of height comfortable for child to stand and 
reach the entire area of the paper. 

Finger paints of good quality. (Not made of starch or other 
substitutes). Preferably buy the original Ruth Shaw finger 
paints prepared by Binney & Smith, from Southern School 
Supply, Raleigh, North Carolina. Colors: Black, red, blue 
and green. 

Other materials needed: some newspaper, a dipping pan, 
glazed finger paint paper, a sprinkling can, a pail to wash 
in, a pencil, tongue depressors, paper towels, old shirts or 
aprons, absorbent cloths, a tablespoon, and an electric 
iron . 

SUGGESTIONS FOR USING WITH MUSIC: Let everyone experiment 
with the paint and paper for some time before introducing 
music. Then listen to the recording once or twice before 
beginning to paint. Always observe this rule: 

START AND STOP WITH THE MUSIC 



STEPS IN FINGER PAINTING 

1. Roll sleeves above elbow, and put on apron. 

2. Put folded sheet of newspaper on floor to receive finished 
painting. 

3. Half fill pail of cool water, placing near it 2 absorbent 
cloths for cleaning up. 

4. Have ready a pan of water 4" by 17" (or cafeteria tray) for 
submerging paper. 

5. Place open jars on supply table along with tongue 
depressors for easy access. 

6. Write name and date on rough or matte side of paper. 

7. Roll paper in small cylinder and submerge in dripping 
pan. Unroll, pulling under, up and out of water until 
both sides of sheet are thoroughly wet. 

- 26 - 



8. Lay wet sheet on table and smooth out air bubbles and 
wrinkles . 

9. Take jar of chosen color to table with tablespoon and 
depressor. 

10. Put 3 level tablespoons of finger paint in center of paper. 

11. Replace jar of paint on supply table. 

12. Mash paint with palm of hand until it is smooth and soft. 

13. Sprinkle with water and spread over entire page. 

14. Add sprinkle of water now and then to keep moist until 
painting is finished. 

15. Wash arms and hands before removing the painting. 

16. Lift paper carefully at upper right corner until sheet is 
loosened from table. 

17. Carry, spread between 2 hands, and lay on newspaper to dry. 

18. Clean up finger paints from table, spoons, tongue depressors 

19. Return jar lids and jars to storage shelf. 

20. Empty pans of water and dry thoroughly to avoid rust. 

21. Later, when painting is dry, press it with a warm iron on 
matte side. 



-27- 



MOVEMENT AND MUS1G 



Much of children's body movement comes from an innate necessity to 
move and a love of movement for its own sake. Joan Russell, a 
leading authority on Modern Dance Education, says: "The child 
needs to experience dance which grows directly from his personal 
movement expression." She is emphatic in stating that dances 
which would involve the child in memorizing set steps and 
patterns, such as folk dances and square dances, PROPERLY BELONG 
TO THE ADULT WORLD. 



Read : Creative Dance in the Primary School by Joan Russell 
(Praeger, 1965) 

SOME TYPES OP FREE MOVEMENT ARE SUMMARIZED BELOW: 

Imaginative, creative, or dramatic movement. Children's own 
ideas, freely expressed in movement reflect their 
observations of the world around them: PEOPLE — ^mother, 
father, sister, brother, grandfather, grandmother, doctor, 
teacher, baby, friend, king, queen, clown, nurse, and 
others. ANIMALS AND INSECTS — dogs, cats, rabbits, birds, 
frogs, worms caterpillars, snakes, bees, mosquitoes, horses, 
animals of the farm, circus, and zoo. NATURAL PHENOMENA— 
rain, snow, wind, heat, cold, seasons, waterfall, mountain, 
ocean, river, valley, fog, lightning, thunderstorm, hurricane, 
life on a farm, cycle of planting, growing, and harvesting. 
MECHANICAL INVENTIONS — trains, boats, airplanes, dump trucks, 
electric saws, steam shovels, water wheels, washing 
machines, printing presses, typewriters, parts of a clock. 
DESIGN AND DIRECTION — circle, straight line, zig-zag, square, 
figure eight, triangle, diagonal, up, down, close together, 
far apart, backward, forward, over, and under. MOOD OR 
QUALITY — sad, gay, angry, sleepy, funny, crazy, peaceful, 
fat, thin, big, little, smooth, jerky, noisy, quiet. 

Movement expressing musical content and form: PATTERN — notes 
of long and short duration, repetitive patterns, like and 
unlike rhythmic and melodic patterns. PITCH — melodic rise 
and fall, high and low. TEMPO— fast , slow, gradually faster 
and slower. DYNAMICS — loud, soft , gradually louder or 
softer. METER, PULSE, BEAT. ACCENT. PHRASING — like and 
unlike phrases, repeated phrases. MUSICAL FORM — A B, ABA, 
ABC, A A B B, etc.; folk song with refrain, simple rondo 
form, theme with variations. 

A few suggestions for movement procedures follow: 1) Move 
tables and chairs aside. Children may help. 2) Have 
children take off their shoes and socks whenever possible. 
Contact of bare feet on the floor is better for "feeling" 
the rhythm. With shoes off children can hear the music 
better, but sneakers or rhythm sandals may be used. 3) 
Encourage, but do not force any child to participate until 

- 28 - 



he is ready. Let him watch the others. 4) Suggest using 
all the floor space, and dancing way out "to the edges." 
5) Work with a small group at a time so that the children 
can keep as much space as possible between them and avoid 
bumping into each other. 6) Use music that is familiar 
to the children before they move to it. 



- 29 



INSTRUMENTS 

QP THE ORCHESTRA 

BEFORE YOU START LISTENING to the recordings on the Children's 
Concert Program, you may want to teach (or review) the 
instruments of the orchestra. There are books, filmstrips, 
pictures and films available in most Elementary School libraries 
Check with your librarian to discover your local resources. 

BRING IN LIVE PLAYERS to demonstrate their instruments whenever 
this is possible. Children learn more from a live demonstration 
than from reading about the instruments or looking at pictures. 



RECORDINGS, FILMSTRIPS, AND FILMS 



Leonard Bernstein ' s Young 
People r s Concerts 

Music Spotlight Series 



I nstruments of the 
Orchestra 



Meet the Instruments 



Book with recordings 



(Simon & 
Schuster) 



Percussion, Brass, Key- 
board, Woodwinds - Film- (Eye Gate) 
strip with recording 



I nstruments of the 
Orchestra 



Excellent recordings of 
all the instruments, 
with teacher's guide. 
Illustrations 

Recordings and film- 
strips are correlated. 
Large color charts of 
all the orchestral 
instruments also 
available. 

6 filmstrips, 6 
recordings 
Historical approach 
appealing to upper 
grades 



(RCA LES-6000) 



( Bowmar ) 



(Jam Handy - 
Scott 

Holyoke, Mass 
01040) 



For films about the orchestra and its instruments, order 
catalog from: Bureau of Audio-Visual Education 

University of North Carolina 

Extension Division 

Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514 



BOOKS 



All About the Symphony 
Orchestra by Dorothy 
Berliner Commins 



Illustrated with 
photographs & line 
drawings 



(Random House) 
1961 



- 30 - 



BOOKS 

Let's Learn About the Illustrated by Anne (Harvey House, Inc.) 

Orchestra by Carla Greene Lewis 1967 

What Makes an Orchestra An excellent book — 

by Jan Balet an old favorite (Oxford University 

Press) 

An Introduction to the A Big Golden Book (Golden Press) 

Instruments of the Illustrations by Alice 1962 

Orchestra by Jane Bunche & Martin Provensen 



- 31 - 



S0URCES QP INSTRUMENTS 



THE WORLD OF PERIPOLE 
Browns Mills, New Jersey 
08015 

RHYTHM BAND, Inc. 
Post Office Box 126 
Fort Worth, Texas 
76101 



LYONS INSTRUMENT COMPANY 
530 Riverview Avenue 
Elkhart, Indiana 
46514 



PERCUSSION INSTRUMENTS 



following are from Lyons Instrument 


Company : 


Current Price 








(Sub: 


iect to 








change) 


5" Triangle with striker 


No. 


4707 


$ 


.65 


7" Tambourine 


No. 


4789 




3.35 


Rhythm Sticks, assorted colors, 










pair 


No. 


4734 




.20 


Rhythm Sticks, 1 notched, 1 










plain 


No. 


4735 




.30 


7" Brass Cymbals with knobs, 










pair 


No. 


4724 




2.60 


Claves - pair 


No. 


4773 




1.15 


Set of 4 Finger Cymbals 


No. 


4727 




3.90 


Castanets on handle 


No. 


4780 




3.33 


Set of two Sand Blocks 


No. 


4766 




.90 



The following are from the World of Peripole 



Oriental Tom-Toms-Medium 

Oriental Tom-Toms-Large 
5" Triangle with striker 
7" Tambourine, 7 pr. jingles 

Smooth Rhythm Sticks, red ename 

Rhythm Sticks, 1 smooth, 1 flut 
7" Brass Cymbals with knobs 

Hand Painted Claves 

Large Rosewood Claves 

Deluxe Mahogany Claves 

Small Rosewood Claves 

Medium Twin Bongos 

Gourd Maracas 

Set of four Finger Cymbals 

Castanets on handle 

Set of two Sand Blocks 

Set of two Jumbo Sand Blocks 



No. 


P3022 


6.95 


No. 


P3023 


9.50 


No. 


P1155 


.65 


No. 


P3107 


5.00 


1 No. 


P2051 


.50 


ed No. 


P2053 


.55 


No. 


P2575 


5.25 


No. 


P2577 


2.25 


No. 


V2601 


3.40 


No. 


P2578 


3.95 


No. 


V2602 


2.60 


No. 


P3901 


9.95 


No. 


P3501 


2.25 


No. 


P2501 


4.50 


No. 


P2156 


3.95 


No. 


P2002 


.90 


No. 


P2001 


1.30 



- 32 - 



The following may be ordered from Lyons or from the manufacturer, 

Ludwig Industries 

1728 North Damen Avenue 

Chicago, Illinois 60647 



Bell Boy (Jingle bells on a flat handle) 



$1.00 



The following are from Rhythm Band, Inc 



Chinese Tom-Tom, 10'* x 4" deep 

with mallet 
5" Triangle with striker and holder 
7" Tambourine, 6 pair jingles 

Rhythm Sticks, 1 fluted, 1 plain 

Rhythm Sticks, 2 plain 
7" Brass Cymbals with knobs, pair 

Pair Hardwood Claves 

Pair Deluxe Rosewood Claves 

Medium Twin Bongos 

Medium Maracas, colored wood 

Set of 4 Brass Finger Cymbals 

Castanet on handle 

Jumbo Sand Blocks, pair 

Send for Catalogs 







Current 






Price 






(Subject to 






change) 


No. 


RB-1115X 


$8.75 


No. 


RB-749 


.95 


No. 


RB-925 


3.50 


No. 


RB-767 


.32 


No. 


RB-768 


.26 


No. 


RB-732 


3.65 


No. 


RB-723 


1.30 


No. 


RB-724 


2.05 


No. 


RB-1302 


6.95 


No. 


RB-1203 


2.95 


No. 


RB-784 


2.50 


No. 


RB-858 


.80 


No. 


RB-753 


.90 



MELODY 



INSTRUMENTS 



Color Xylophones stamped with 
numbers and letters, 8 notes, key 
of C. 



Current 
Price 

(Subject to 
change) 

$12.95 Doz. 



Order by dozen from: 

Childhood Interests, Inc. 
Roselle Park, New Jersey 

Zim-Gar Bells - 20 notes, chromatic 

Order from: 



7.50 



George M. Froelich, Inc 
130 Eastern Avenue 
Baltimore, Maryland 



- 33 



Monarch Deluxe Chromatic Bells No. 1420-C 20.00 
Order from Lyons Instrument Co. 
(Address under Sources of 
Instruments) 



The following are from the World of Peripole: 

"Royal" Song Bells - Octave No. P5080 5.00 
diatonic (Quantities of 6 
or more $4.00 each) 

"Royal" Song Bells - 20 note No. P5202 14.50 
chromatic (Quantities of 6 
or more $13.50 each) 
With steel-enforced fibre case 



The following are from Rhythm Band, Inc.: 

The Artist, Jr. Resonator Bells No. RB2121 39.50 
20 notes, 1-1/2 octaves, 
beginning with middle C 
In polyvinyl case 

8 note Diatonic Bell Set, No. RB-2201 5.50 
Middle C to one octave above 

Colorful Bell Set, good for K-3 No. RB-2305 3.95 
grades, C above Middle C to C 
Diatonic, each note a different 
color 

Add-a-Note-8 notes with No. RB-2520 5.95 

additional F# and B^ 3 , with two 

mallets 



WIND INSTRUMENTS 



Small Wind Instruments 



The following are from Lyons Instrument Co.: 

Tonettes (Specify black or red) .80 

Tonette Case No. T-24 .20 

Flutophones (Specify black or 

white or red) .80 

Flutophone case No. 4692 



The following are from the World of Peripole: 

Tonettes (Specify black, red, No. P1322 .80 
blue, yellow, green, white) 

- 34 - 






No. 


RB-1801 


.85 


No. 


RB-1802 


.85 

9.48 
110.00 



Song Flutes (Specify black, No. P1320 .80 
ivory, yellow, red) 

Quantity prices on tonettes 

& song flutes per dozen .70 

per gross .60 

over 500 .50 



Note: Mouthpieces may be 
sterilized with Zepharin 
chloride, available at any 
drug store. Allow the 
mouthpiece to remain in the 
solution for several 
minutes, then rinse in 
water . 



The following are from Rhythm Band, Inc.: 

Tonettes (Specify color) 
Black with Bell 
Red with Bell 

per dozen 
per gross 

Instruction book for tonette 
and small winds: 

Melody Fun by Forrest Buchtel No. RB-1809 



Recorders 

Recorders - Soprano, C - Applewood 3.95 

(Imported from Germany 

Order from: Burritt Music Co. 

Attention: Mr. Fred Redente 
23 Main Street 
New Britain, Conn. 

Instruction Book: 

First Tunes for Tonette or 1.50 

Soprano Recorder by Elizabeth 
Scheinwold (Kalmus). 

Order from Burritt Music Co. 



35 - 



No. 


P1305 


2.50 


No. 


P1306 


2.75 


No. 


1307 


2.95 



The following are from Lyons Instrument Co.: 

Kitchlng Soprano Recorder No. NK-700 2.20 
(with case) 

Dolmetsch Soprano Recorder No. 8321 2.76 

New "Cambridge" Soprano No. R50 1.70 

Recorder 

Check the catalog for wood recorders 
imported from Germany - C 
Soprano, F. Alto, C Tenor, F 
Bass 



The following are from the World of Peripole: 

Pearwood Recorders, Key of C: 

"Student" 

"Standard" 

"Deluxe" 

The following are from Rhythm Band, Inc. : 

Renaissance Soprano Recorders No. RB-1780 1.75 
(Baroque fingering) 

Renaissance Soprano Recorders No. RB-1780 G 1.75 
(German fingering) 

Quilted vinyl bag for Soprano No. RB-1784 .45 
Recorder 

HARMONY INSTRUMENTS 



The following is from Lyons Instrument 
Co: 

The "Original" Autoharp-American 45.15 

Made by Oscar Schmidt Model L-12 

12 Bar (G minor, B flat, A sev. , 
D min. , F, E sev. , 
C sev., G sev., A minor, 
C, D sev. , G) 

15 Bar (Basic twelve chords plus 50.80 

E flat, F sev., D) L-15 EBH 



- 36 - 



The following is from the World of Peripole: 

Chromaharp - 12 bar N 
15 bar 

Autoharp Carrying Case 



The following is from Rhythm Band, Inc.: 

Chromaharp - 12 bar 
15 bar 

Economy Carrying Case 



5-chord MiniHarp _ C,F,B b , 
G 7 and C 7 

Favorite Songs for the MiniHarp 
by Ken Harris 



No. 


P1212 


54 


95 


No. 


P1215 


59 


95 


No. 


P1230 


15 


95 



No. 


RB1530 


54 


95 


No. 


RB1545 


59 


50 


No. 


RB1509 


7 


95 


No. 


RB1505 


29 


95 


No. 


RB7004 


2 


95 



- 37 



" 






•s